History of Marion National Cemetery

Marion National Cemetery - Northern Indiana Funeral CareIn 1888, Colonel George W. Steele, Indiana’s congressional representative, successfully convinced his colleagues in Washington, D.C., of the need for a Soldier’s Home in Grant County. Subsequently, the 31-acre Marion Branch of the National Home opened in 1889 to provide shelter and comfort for the region’s veterans. Along with the home, a cemetery was established for the interment of the men who died there. The first burial occurred two years after the home opened in May 1890. For most of its history, the cemetery at the Marion Home has quietly and efficiently cared for the needs of the nation’s veterans with few significant changes.

In 1920, the home was renamed Marion Sanatorium and in 1930, administration of the home was transferred to the newly created Veterans Administration. Additional acreage was transferred from the Veterans Health Administration twice in the cemetery’s history. Six acres were added in 1974 and six more in 1988. As of 1973, with the passage of the National Cemetery Act, the cemetery became part of the National Cemetery system and its name was changed to Marion National Cemetery. As of 2004, over 8,000 men and women have been buried in Marion National Cemetery, including Medal of Honor recipients Henry Hyde, Nicholas Irwin and Jeremiah Kuder.

Marion National Cemetery was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1999. This cemetery has space available to accommodate casketed and cremated remains.

Northern Indiana Funeral Care is proud to conduct interment services at Marion National Cemetery.  Contact us at 1-877-382-2756 for more information or request a brochure.

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